Carrot, Ginger, Turmeric Soup

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This cozy soup makes me all warm and fuzzy on those rare crisp fall days that happen in LA. Carrots are the perfect healing food when you’re starting to feel under-the-weather and turmeric has an arsenal of health benefits including it’s anti-inflammatory properties. But most importantly, it’s delicious and all of my kids love it! I freeze it in ice cube trays to have on hand for my 8-month-old Annabel. If you’re fortunate enough to have fresh turmeric, use 2 tbsp instead of the ground, and add it at the end with the ginger. Top with roasted chickpeas if you’re into a mediterranean twist. Enjoy!

CARROT, GINGER, TURMERIC SOUP

2 lbs carrots
1/2 sweet onion
1/2 sweet potato
6 cups veggie broth
2 tablespoons chopped fresh ginger
1 to 2 teaspoons ground turmeric
s & fresh cracked black pepper
Greek Yogurt, Cilantro, dill, parsley or roasted chickpeas for garnish

Bring to a boil the onions, carrots, sweet potato, turmeric and a pinch of salt in the veggie stock. Reduce to a simmer for 20 minutes or until sweet potatoes and carrots are tender. Put into a blender with the ginger. Serve in soup plates with a heavy dollop of greek yogurt and garnish with herbs, salt and freshly cracked pepper.

Goji Berry Tea + Benefits and Other Uses

I’ve had really low energy this pregnancy and my brother-in-law Jared, who happens to be a gifted healer, suggested adding goji berries to my tea in the mornings and then eating them. They’ve become such a pleasure in my life that I had to share the benefits with you.  And don’t forget your kids.  Olivia and Joshua love goji berries!

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Native to the Himalayan Mountains, the goji berry has been used for thousands of years for both medicinal and culinary purposes.

A good protein source, these miracle berries contain 18 amino acids (including all of the 8 essential ones). They have a whole host of other vitamins (A, c, B-1, B-2, B-6 and E) and trace minerals including calcium, cooper, iron, phosphorus, selenium and zinc. They are rich in carotenoids that protect your vision, and antioxidants to repair your skin. They’ve also been shown to increase energy, athletic performance, help digestion and reduce stress and fatigue. They also have anti-aging and UV protecting properties. Need I say more?

How to incorporate them into your diet

  • Make a tea: add them to warm water or herb tea and then eat them after you drink it.
  • Enjoy them plain, in oatmeal or trailmix
  • Add them to homemade granola, scones and muffins
  • Use them for garnish: on shakes (try the ABC Shake), soups (amazing on pumpkin and butternut squash varieties) and in salads.

Important to note, while doing my research I came across some precautions with goji berries. They are in the nightshade family (with eggplants and tomatoes) and some people can be allergic, so monitor your reaction. They also tend be a high pesticide crop, so get yours from a reliable source. And lastly, it’s always good to check in with your care provider when adding new foods to your diet, especially when on prescriptions. These have been known to negatively effect those on blood thinners.

I’d love to hear, how are you using goji berries? And please link to your favorite recipes with them so that we can all enjoy!

The Healing Benefits of Palo Santo

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My girlfriend, Lacey Mackey of Natureal Mom, discovered the healing and spiritual purpose of Palo Santo on a recent stay in Ojai.  The sweet woodsy aroma alone was enough to lure me into purchasing some sticks to burn myself (you can get them here).  They’re also known to cure a hangover and ward off mosquitos.  Perhaps the perfect way to recalibrate for fall, you can read about all the beautiful benefits here.

Can Emotional Intelligence Be Taught?

Expressing oneself doesn’t come easily for many, myself included.  And the burdens of unprocessed emotions can take an incredible toll on the mind, body and spirit.  Furthermore, until processed they can prevent one from learning new concepts.

This post from The New York Times focuses on children, how to protect them and enhance their learning ability by teaching them the art of processing and expressing emotions.  While the article focuses on school programs (worth looking into for your kids school), you can apply some of these concepts at home with yourself and your children.

Parents: A Must for Your Bookshelf!

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With cold and flu season approaching us in the upcoming months, I wanted to highlight a book that has been a saving grace in my household, Smart Medicine for a Healthier Child by Janet Zand, Robert Rountree and Rachel Walton.

What I really love about this book is that you can look up your child’s ailment and see both alternative (herbal and homeopathic treatments) and conventional treatments and dietary guidelines.  It also gives mention to the appropriate times to call your doctor.

To a happy, healthy new year, Le’shana Tova!