Travel Food, Try This!

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Green salad w/cucumber dressing, wild mushroom soup, a side of ratatouille and citron tea.

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Veggie spring rolls, wild mushroom soup and ginger lemongrass tea.

Eating a nourishing meal while traveling is usually just a matter of being creative with your choices.  I’m all for the occasional indulgence, but like that clean, vibrant feeling that eating well provides.

When healthy options are lacking, create them!

  • Ask to have your entree grilled or steamed, light on oil
  • See if the chef can create a veggie platter for you
  • Ask for sauce to be light or on the side
  • Forgo sauce and season with a squeeze of lemon, olive oil and a pinch of salt
  • Go piece meal: Instead of ordering an entree, scan the appetizers, soups and salads. There are often healthy options that you can play around with to create your meal

I hope the yummy piece meal lunch photos I took while traveling over the weekend inspire you to eat delicious meals that make you feel great.  Note: I should have asked them not to bring the bread.  I didn’t eat it and it went to waste.  Other times I’ve eaten it all and suffered the results of my gluten intolerance.

Send me your other travel food thoughts.  I’m a sponge for this stuff!

Worm Composting Week 2: Ants

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We are in our second week with the worm composting bin. Naturally, the soil and food supply attracted some ants. While they do no harm to the bin, they are a nuisance, so I got rid of them.

Here are a few easy tricks.

  1. Wipe the bin and surrounding area with water and lemon juice or lemon oil. This will get rid of the ants and their scent trail.
  2. If the composting bin has legs, stick it in a tray of soapy water. I added lemon oil to mine because the ants dislike it.
  3. Ants like exposed food so stir the compost. I enlisted Joshua to help with this one. I also added some ground up leaves and a little extra dirt to help the process along.
  4. Make sure the soil is a little damp. It’s nice to have a spray bottle with water designated for the compost bin. Ants like a dry environment and the compost needs a little moisture to thrive anyhow.

Additionally, the CA temperatures have exceeded the ideal range for worms (which is 40-80 degrees F.) I have been keeping the bin shaded with a box. It seems to have helped and the worms are thriving.

I’d love to hear about your suggestions and experiences!

Worm Composting

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For years I’ve had guilt about tossing out my compostable items.  I was too lazy to take this “gardner’s gold” to feed a friends chickens, local farm or… (what else do you do with compost when you don’t live in a town that collects it?  Please do tell).  A few weeks ago I gave up the word lazy and ordered this worm composting bin from Amazon.  I set it up per the included DVD instructions, laying down one sheet of newspaper and then a combination of moist cork and shredded paper.  I mixed in some dirt and a few composting items then put it in a relatively cool corner outside and waited for my worms (these ones on Amazon) to arrive, which happened today!

When the worms arrived they required a drink (half cup of water into their soil) before putting them into the compost.  I then laid a sheet of wet newspaper on top to seal in the moisture.  They seem healthy and have acclimated quickly into their new environment. I’ll report on the progress, in the meantime, please send me your tips!  If you don’t compost yet, perhaps you’ll consider sharing the journey with me.

Cinnamon Ginger Carrots

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These baked carrots are a delicious, easy side dish for lunch or dinner. I have not given measurements on this. It’s so simple and should be tailored to your flavor preference. If you love ginger add more ginger.  Next time I make these I’m going to get smaller carrots from the farmers market and make them whole for an extra beautiful presentation.

What you’ll need:

  • Carrots- I like to have two carrots per person
  • Coconut oil
  • Cinnamon
  • Nutmeg
  • Powdered ginger

Wash and cut your carrots into desired size and lightly coat with coconut oil.  If using organic carrots, leave the skin on for extra nutrients and flavor.  Stir your desired portions of spices together.  I typically use equal parts cinnamon and ginger with a few dashes of nutmeg, but everyone’s taste will differ. Sprinkle the spices onto carrots and mix together.  You can add a pinch of salt as well, but I find it unnecessary.

Bake at 350 for about 30 minutes or until carrots reach desired tenderness.

I’d love to know what you serve these with. Enjoy!

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